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Quarantine Procedures for TPS Staff

Just as we have practices in place to keep our students, team, and families safe, we also have protocols to follow if a staff member develops symptoms of COVID-19, tests positive for COVID-19, or has close contact with someone who has tested positive or is presumed to be positive for COVID-19.

When will I need to stay home from work (and for how long)?

If you have COVID-19, you will need to isolate for at least 10 days after your symptoms start or you test positive if you’re asymptomatic. Individuals can continue to test positive for a while after having COVID-19, even though they have recovered. You can discontinue isolation and return to work on day 11 as long as you’ve been fever-free for 24 hours without fever-reducing medicines and as long as your symptoms are improving overall. If you test positive for COVID-19 again in the next 90 days, you won’t have to isolate again, as long as you are asymptomatic.

You may also need to quarantine and stay home from work for 7-10 days for various COVID-19 related reasons, including if you have had known close contact with a positive person or traveled internationally to certain countries. However, depending on the circumstances, you may not have to quarantine at all, or you may still be able to come to work during your quarantine:

  • People who have already had COVID (laboratory-confirmed) in the last 90 days but have recovered, or who have been fully vaccinated for COVID-19 in the last 90 days, do not need to quarantine after they have close contact with someone who has COVID-19, as long as they are asymptomatic.
    • Fully vaccinated means it has been at least 14 days since your second dose of a two-dose vaccine, or your first dose of a single-dose vaccine.
  • Additionally, the district’s critical infrastructure workforce may continue working onsite during quarantine as long as they remain asymptomatic, do not test positive, and follow certain safety protocols – which are similar to the steps we are already taking across the district to reduce the spread of COVID-19 – for 14 days.

Quarantine

According to the CDC: “Quarantine is used to keep someone who might have been exposed to COVID-19 away from others. Quarantine helps prevent spread of disease that can occur before a person knows they are sick or if they are infected with the virus without feeling symptoms. People in quarantine should stay home, separate themselves from others, monitor their health, and follow directions from their state or local health department.” The district’s critical infrastructure workforce may continue to report to work during quarantine if they remain asymptomatic, don’t test positive, and special safety protocols are followed during quarantine.

Isolation

Isolation is different from quarantine. Isolation keeps someone who is infected with the virus away from others, even in their home. While quarantine lasts between 7-10 days from the last close contact, isolation lasts at least a full 10 days (sometimes more) from the onset of symptoms or the positive test collection (if asymptomatic).

HOW LONG DOES QUARANTINE LAST?

The incubation period for COVID-19 is 2-14 days after exposure. Therefore, you could receive a negative test result on day 5 and a positive test result on day 10. However, the majority of persons will begin to exhibit symptoms and/or test positive by days 5-7. Therefore, the CDC has approved the following options for reducing quarantine to as little as 7 days:

  • Quarantine can end after day 10 (i.e., on day 11) without testing and if no symptoms have been reported during daily monitoring.
  • Quarantine can end after day 7 (i.e., on day 8) with a negative RT-PCR test and if no symptoms have been reported during daily monitoring. The RT-PCR test can be taken no earlier than day 5, and quarantine cannot end any earlier than day 8.

However, even though quarantine can end early as outlined above, the employee must self-monitor for symptoms, practice correct and consistent mask use, social distancing, hand and cough hygiene, cleaning and disinfection, avoiding crowds, ensuring adequate indoor ventilation for the full 14 days.

If symptoms develop at any point during the 14-day period, or if you test positive even if you remain asymptomatic, you should immediately isolate yourself from others. Do not come to work. Your quarantine would then change to 10 days of isolation.

FOR EXAMPLE:
Employee must quarantine due to close contact with positive person on day 0 (and can’t work on-site)


Stays home days 1-7

Tests negative on day 5, 6 or 7

Feels fine/has no symptoms, so returns to work on day 8

Develops symptoms on day 10, goes home immediately

Tests positive on day 11

Isolation begins day on day 10; can return to work 11 days later (day 20 after exposure) if no fever for 24 hours, symptoms overall improving.

Quarantine begins on your last day of close contact with a positive person while they are in their isolation period. If you can’t avoid contact with a person who has COVID-19, your quarantine won’t start until their isolation period ends – meaning you will have to stay home or follow additional safety protocols at work for a longer period of time.

WHAT DO I DO IF…

I have tested positive for COVID-19.

  • Do not come to work.
  • Contact your supervisor and tell them you’ve tested positive.
  • Tell your supervisor or your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact whether you have tested positive for COVID-19 before. If you’ve tested positive for COVID-19 before in the last 90 days, you may not need to isolate as long as you are asymptomatic.
  • If this is your first positive test for COVID-19 in the last 90 days, you will need to isolate for at least 10 days and may need to take leave, which you can apply for here. (However, do not just apply for leave without talking to your supervisor. They will confirm for you whether you need to isolate and apply for leave.)

You may return to work on-site following isolation if:

  • At least ten (10) days have passed since the onset of your symptoms or your positive test; AND
  • Your symptoms have improved; AND
  • You have been fever-free for at least 24 hours without taking fever-reducing
  • medicines.
  • You must also always have the express permission of your supervisor or your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact permission before returning to work.

I had contact with someone who has tested positive or is presumed positive for COVID-19 (i.e., they have symptoms of COVID-19 and a known exposure).

  • Do not come to work until you have talked with your supervisor.
  • Your supervisor will determine appropriate next steps for your specific situation in consultation with your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact. Appropriate next steps will depend on whether you had close contact with the person during their infectious period (which will require knowing when their symptoms started and when they tested positive), whether you have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or had and recovered from COVID-19 in the last 90 days, and other factors.
  • Even if you had close contact with the person during their infectious period, you may not have to quarantine and may be able to continue working on-site with special safety protocols in place. Alternatively, you may need to quarantine and take leave. Again, your supervisor and your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact will make that determination in accordance with district guidance based on the specific circumstances of your situation.
  • You should contact your health care provider regarding whether and when you should be tested.
  • Tell your supervisor immediately if your household member tests positive. If at any point you develop symptoms or test positive yourself, do not come to work.

You may remain at work or return to work on-site following close contact with a positive or presumed positive person only if:

  • Your supervisor and/or your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact have expressly authorized you to remain at work or return to work on-site.
  • Special safety protocols are followed for a full 14 days after your last close contact. Your supervisor and/or your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact will give you directions on this for your specific situation.

I’m asymptomatic, but a member of my household is experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and awaiting test results.

  • Do not come to work until you have talked with your supervisor.
  • Your supervisor and your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact will determine appropriate next steps for your specific situation in consultation with your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact. Appropriate next steps for your situation will depend on whether your household member has
  • had known close contact with a positive or presumed positive person, whether you have had or will continue to have close contact with your household member, and whether you and/or your household member have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or had and recovered from COVID-19 in the last 90 days, among other factors.
  • You may be able to continue working on-site with special safety protocols in place, as long as you remain asymptomatic and don’t test positive, or you may need to take leave. Your supervisor and your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact will make that determination in accordance with district guidance.
  • You should contact your health care provider regarding whether and when you should be tested for COVID-19.
  • Tell your supervisor immediately if your household member tests positive. If at any point you develop symptoms or test positive yourself, do not come to work.

I’m asymptomatic, but a household member has tested positive for COVID-19.

  • Do not come to work until you have talked with your supervisor.
  • Your supervisor and your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact will determine appropriate next steps based on the circumstances. Unless you have had COVID-19 yourself in the last 90 days, or unless you have not had and won’t have close contact with your household member while they are infectious, you will need to quarantine for between 7 – 10 days after your last close contact with your household member during their infectious period.
  • You may be able to continue working on-site during your quarantine period with special safety protocols in place, as long as you remain asymptomatic and don’t test positive. Your supervisor and your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact will make that determination in accordance with district guidance.
  • You should contact your health care provider regarding whether and when you should be tested for COVID-19.
  • If at any point you develop symptoms or test positive yourself, do not come to work.

I begin experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 while away from work.

  • Do not come to work until you have talked with your supervisor and they or your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact have authorized you to come to work.
  • Your supervisor and/or your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact will need details about what symptoms you are experiencing, whether you have been vaccinated, whether you have had COVID-19 already, whether you have had known close contact with someone with COVID-19, whether you have recently traveled internationally, when your symptoms started, when and where you were last on-site at work, and who you may have had contact with so they can determine appropriate next steps.
  • You will likely be instructed to stay home and advised to contact your healthcare provider for advice regarding your symptoms and whether and when you should be tested for COVID-19. In that case you will need to use leave, which you can apply for here. (Don’t apply unless you have talked to your supervisor or your site’s COVID-19 point of contact and they have instructed you to apply for leave.)
  • If you test positive for COVID-19 and haven’t already had and recovered from COVID-19 in the last 90 days, you won’t be able to return to work until 10 days have passed since the onset of your symptoms (provided that your symptoms are improving, and you have been fever-free for at least 24 hours without taking fever-reducing medicines). If you test negative for COVID-19, you may be able to return to work sooner than 10 days if you’ve already had and recovered from COVID-19, you’ve been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, and/or a healthcare provider confirms that there is another explanation for your symptoms and that you aren’t contagious. Do not come to work unless you have the express permission of your supervisor or your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact to do so.

I begin experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 during the work day.

  • You should immediately isolate yourself as much as possible and contact your supervisor.
  • You will need to leave the building and will be isolated within the building if you can’t leave immediately. Your supervisor and/or your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact will advise you (by phone if you’ve left the building) on next steps.
  • Your supervisor and/or your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact will need details about what symptoms you are experiencing, whether you have been vaccinated, whether you have had COVID-19 already, whether you have had known close contact with someone with COVID-19, whether you have recently traveled internationally, when your symptoms started, when and where you were last on-site at work, and who you may have had contact with so they can determine appropriate next steps.
  • You will likely be instructed to stay home and advised to contact your healthcare provider for advice regarding your symptoms and whether and when you should be tested for COVID-19. In that case you will need to use leave, which you can apply for here. (Don’t apply unless you have talked to your supervisor or your site’s COVID-19 point of contact and they have instructed you to apply for leave.)
  • If you test positive for COVID-19 and haven’t already had and recovered from COVID-19 in the last 90 days, you won’t be able to return to work until 10 days have passed since the onset of your symptoms (provided that your symptoms are improving, and you have been fever-free for at least 24 hours without taking fever-reducing medicines). If you test negative for COVID-19, you may be able to return to work sooner than 10 days if you’ve already had and recovered from COVID-19, you’ve been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, and/or a healthcare provider confirms that there is another explanation for your symptoms and that you aren’t contagious. Do not come to work unless you have the express permission of your supervisor or your site’s COVID-19 Point of Contact to do so.

Additional Guidance

Important: The district conducts its own internal contact tracing and notifies the Tulsa Health Department of all positive cases. We will contact you via phone and/or e-mail if we believe you have had close contact at work with someone who is positive or presumed to be positive for COVID-19. Please make sure that the district has your current personal phone number on file.

Use Screen & Go Before Coming to Work

Every morning before you come to work, you should be answering the questions on the Screen & Go app. Go here for more info about how to use Screen & Go. If you get a red screen on Screen & Go, do not come to work before talking with your supervisor. If you get a yellow screen, you may come to work, but talk to your supervisor immediately upon your arrival at work.

Do NOT come to work and call your supervisor if:

  • You are exhibiting symptoms of COVID-19, including:
    • Fever (100.4o Fahrenheit or higher) or feeling feverish (chills, sweating)
    • New cough
    • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
    • Muscle aches or body aches
    • New loss of taste or smell
    • Headache
    • Sore throat
    • Nausea
    • Vomiting or diarrhea
    • Fatigue
    • Congestion or runny nose

If you begin experiencing COVID-19 symptoms while at work, isolate yourself or maintain as much physical distance as possible between yourself and others and contact your supervisor immediately.

  • You test positive for COVID-19. (Tell your supervisor if you’ve already had COVID-19 and this isn’t your first positive test.)
  • You’ve had close contact in the last 14 days with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19, or is presumed positive for COVID-19 because they are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 after having close contact with someone who tested positive. (Tell your supervisor if you’ve been vaccinated against COVID-19 or you’ve already had COVID-19.)

Close contact means:

» Contact within 6 feet for 15 minutes or more in a 24-hour period; and

» Other types of direct contact, e.g., kissing/hugging, sharing eating or drinking utensils, being coughed/sneezed on or otherwise coming into contact with respiratory secretions, and caring for someone.

  • A health care provider or public health professional has advised you to quarantine or isolate due to concerns you have or may have COVID-19.
  • In the last 14 days, you have traveled internationally to one of these countries from which entry to the US is restricted for certain individuals. (Please click on the link above to check the list as it may change, but currently they are:
    • China
    • Iran
    • European Schengen area (Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Monaco, San Marino, Vatican City)
    • United Kingdom (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland)
    • Republic of Ireland
    • Brazil
    • South Africa

If you have traveled on a cruise ship or internationally to a country designated by the CDC as Warning Level 3 or 4 due to COVID-19, but which is not one of the countries listed here, you may still come to work, but please contact your supervisor immediately upon your arrival at work to discuss your situation.